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Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake

Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake

"Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake pine" One pine miraculously survived the tsunami that hit 70,000 pine forests

  • On March 11, 2011, an earthquake and tsunami struck Rikuzentakata City (The Great East Japan Earthquake), killing nearly 2,000 people and destroying urban areas and areas along the sea.
    Most of the Takata-matsubara, which is said to have protected the town of Takada from the repeated tsunami of the past, is said to be about 70,000 trees, but most of it leaked out, but the only thing that survived was the "Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake". is.

    It was a miraculous pine tree that survived the tsunami, but it was confirmed to have died in May 2012 after being severely damaged by being covered with seawater by the tsunami.
    However, immediately after the earthquake, Rikuzentakata City decided to preserve and maintain Ipponmatsu, which has been popular not only with citizens but also with people all over the world, as a monument in order to pass it on to future generations. became.

    That is the Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake Preservation Project.

    Up to now, many people have seen the male figure standing up against the sky of Rikuzentakata.
    The Great East Japan Earthquake it is a monument that conveys the The Great East Japan Earthquake to posterity, it will continue to give courage and excitement to many people as a symbol of reconstruction and a power spot of Rikuzentakata!
    When you visit for sightseeing, I would like you to see the Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake!

    You can walk from "The Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami Denkankan" (Iwate TSUNAMI Memorial Tsunami Iwate TSUNAMI Memorial).
    If you come by car, please use the facility parking lot.
  • A Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake character designed by cartoonist Takashi Yanase"Hyoro Matsu-kun"

    Takashi Yanase(deceased)
    (The creator of the cartoonist Anpanman)

    Rikuzentakata City from Rikuzentakata City website Rikuzentakata City

    I was almost 93 years old when I was almost swept away in the ocean of the roaring mass media, but until I was 93 years old, I managed to survive and work.
    Therefore, I was completely empathized with the pine tree of Rikuzentakata, which survived only one of the 70,000 pine trees after the The Great East Japan Earthquake.
    Rikuzentakata a song for the pine tree at his own expense, made a CD, and made a handkerchief.
    I wanted to donate little by little over a long period of time.
    However, the very long pine called the tree of hope seems to be in a very dangerous state.
    Fortunately, the four pine tree children grafted seem to grow up quickly.
    The city seems to be working on a plan to permanently preserve the pine tree I named Hyoromatsu as the tree of hope.
    We hope that as many of you as possible will support this plan and bring your pine trees back to life with your help.
    That is because I think that it will inspire not only Japan but all over the world as a symbol of future hope.

    ※Takashi Yanase passed away on October 13, 2013.We sincerely wish you all the best.


    If you're a fan of Anpanman's creator, Takashi Yanase, you'll want to see the character design once!
    Like Anpanman, Hyoromatsu-kun continues to watch over the sea in Rikuzentakata as the owner of a gentle and strong heart!

Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake Photo Gallery

Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake | Basic information

Opening hoursFrom 9:00 to 18:00
(Takata-matsubara Tsunami Reconstruction Memorial Park)
location〒029-2204 176-6 Sunamori, Kesen Town, Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture Takata-matsubara Tsunami Recovery Memorial Park
Parking<Free>
Please use the parking lots of "Roadside Station Takata-matsubara" and "The Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami Denkankan".

To reach "Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake", use the road in Takata-matsubara Tsunami Reconstruction Memorial Park from the roadside station "Takata-matsubara".
The garden path is only available during the opening hours of the park.
The toilet is at the roadside station.
Contact informationRikuzentakata City Hall
TEL:0192-54-2111
Official websitehttp://www.city.rikuzentakata.iwate.jp/kategorie/fukkou/ipponmatu/ipponmatu.html

Access Directions from Capital Hotel 1000

  • Rikuzentakata Capital Hotel 1000 ▶ The Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami Tradition Hall(Parking)

    <How to move from the hotel>

    (Vehicle) Prefectural Road 141-via National Road 45
       About 5 minutes

    (Public transport)
       JR Ofunato Line BRT Bus
       BRT"Takada Kokomae Station" or "Rikuzentakata Station"

       Arrive at "Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake Station"


    <From "Roadside station Takata-matsubara"Up to "The Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake">

     About 10 minutes on foot
     The garden path is on foot.As it is paved, wheelchairs are also available.


    <Address>
    〒029-2204 176-6 Sunamori, Kesen Town, Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture Takata-matsubara Tsunami Recovery Memorial Park
    Directions from Rikuzentakata Capital Hotel 1000 to Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake
  • About "Takata-matsubara Protective Society"

    Takata-matsubara was planted in 1667 (Kanbun 7th year) during the Edo period by Tomoyuki Sugano, a wealthy merchant in Takata, and 6,200 black pine trees were planted with the cooperation of the Sendai domain and residents.
    After that, during the Kyoho era (1716-1736), Mashibayashi was expanded by Shinemon Matsuzaka. The scenery of "Hakuseisho" is one of the scenic spots that have been widely evaluated in Japan.

    It has been designated as a national scenic spot and the Rikuchu Kaigan National Park (currently Sanriku Fukko National Park), and has been selected for various environmental and facility evaluations. In 2009, 1.04 million tourists visited. It was so crowded as a tourist spot.

    Since the establishment of the Takata-matsubara Conservation Society in March 2006, where Rikuzentakata City and citizen volunteers who love Takata-matsubara have joined together, the Takata-matsubara Conservation Society has been the pioneer of pine planting in the Edo period. We have been promoting activities to protect and nurture Takata-matsubara, a white sand and blue pine tree that has been cherished and designated as a national park and a national scenic spot.
    For the citizens, Takata-matsubara is a very important place that gave us various memories when we were accustomed to excursions, clamming, and swimming since we were children.

    The The Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami on March 11, 2011 will leave a pine tree behind, and its wonderful scenic beauty will be destroyed.(The remaining one pine is the famous "Kiseki-no-Ippommatsu Survived pine tree after the big earthquake pine")
    Takata-matsubara Conservation Society has been working since April 2011 with the aim of revitalizing this place that symbolizes Rikuzentakata City.

    On August 6, 2015, we completed the registration as the "Non-Profit Organization Takata-matsubara Protective Society" and continue to this day.
    In cooperation with Iwate Prefecture and Rikuzentakata City, we started planting pine seedlings in the new Takata-matsubara in 2017 with the cooperation of many people who support us.
    About 3,000 pine seedlings were planted in 2017 and about 3,500 pine seedlings were planted in 2018.In 2019 (the first year of Reiwa), we plan to plant about 3,500 pine seedlings.

    It is said that it will take about 50 years to regenerate Takata-matsubara, which is still white sand and blue pine.
    Takata-matsubara Conservation Society promotes the participation of young members and continues to strive to revitalize Takata-matsubara.